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Featured, from left: Yolanda González, District Manager at Wells Fargo Upper Rio Grande Valley & Laredo; Sabrina Walker-Hernández, Chief Professional Officer/Executive Director, Boys and Girls Club of Edinburg Rio Grande Valley; and Alma Ortega-Johnson, Area President South Texas Region-Wells Fargo, on Friday, May 8, 2015, during grand opening ceremony of the Wells Fargo newest branch, located at 1628 West University Drive.

Photograph By DIEGO REYNA

Edinburg’s retail economy for the month of March 2015 was 9.84 percent better than the same month last year, generating $1,926,165.61 in local sales taxes, compared with $1,753,587.06 in March 2014, the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation has announced. The EEDC, led by Executive Director Agustín “Gus” García, Jr., is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg Mayor and Edinburg City Council. Mayor Richard García (no relation to Gus García, Jr.) is President of the EEDC Board of Directors. That showing was the best among all of the Valley’s major cities for March 2015, according to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, which on Wednesday, May 6, released statewide figures, which represents the most up-to-date figures information for that state agency. Edinburg’s almost 10 percent improvement also was significantly higher than the average of all city economies in the state, which combined showed an improvement of 6.2 percent when comparing March 2015 with the same month last year, the state comptroller’s office also reported.The amount of local sales taxes collected helps reflect the strength of an economy, along with construction activities, per capita income, education, historical performances, and related trends. Year-to-date, the Edinburg economy is 7.15 percent ahead of 2014, having produced $8,603,397.65 from January through March 2015 in local sales taxes, compared with $8,028,833.80 during the same period last year. The local sales tax figures represent sales made in March as well as January, February and March sales by businesses that report tax quarterly, sent to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts in April, and returned as sales tax rebates to the respective local government entities in May. The local sales tax is used in Edinburg to help pay for many city services, while the EEDC uses its one-half cent local sales tax to help generate economic development in the city. The sales tax, formally known as the State Sales and Use Tax, is imposed on all retail sales, leases and rentals of most goods, as well as taxable services. Texas cities, counties, transit authorities and special purpose districts have the option of imposing an additional local sales tax for a combined total of state and local taxes of 8 1/4% (.0825).

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Edinburg retail economy for March 2015 shows Valley’s best rate of growth with an almost 10 percent improvement over March 2014

By DAVID A. DÍAZ
Legislativemedia@aol.com

Edinburg’s retail economy for the month of March 2015 was 9.84 percent better than the same month last year, generating $1,926,165.61 in local sales taxes, compared with $1,753,587.06 in March 2014, the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation has announced.

The EEDC, led by Executive Director Agustín “Gus” García, Jr., is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg Mayor and Edinburg City Council.

Mayor Richard García (no relation to Gus García, Jr.) is President of the EEDC Board of Directors.

That showing was the best among all of the Valley’s major cities for March 2015, according to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, which on Wednesday, May 6, released statewide figures, which represents the most up-to-date figures information for that state agency.

Edinburg’s almost 10 percent improvement also was significantly higher than the average of all city economies in the state, which combined showed an improvement of 6.2 percent when comparing March 2015 with the same month last year, the state comptroller’s office also reported.

The amount of local sales taxes collected helps reflect the strength of an economy, along with construction activities, per capita income, education, historical performances, and related trends.

Year-to-date, the Edinburg economy is 7.15 percent ahead of 2014, having produced $8,603,397.65 from January through March 2015 in local sales taxes, compared with $8,028,833.80 during the same period last year.

The local sales tax figures represent sales made in March as well as January, February and March sales by businesses that report tax quarterly, sent to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts in April, and returned as sales tax rebates to the respective local government entities in May.

The local sales tax is used in Edinburg to help pay for many city services, while the EEDC uses its one-half cent local sales tax to help generate economic development in the city.

The sales tax, formally known as the State Sales and Use Tax, is imposed on all retail sales, leases and rentals of most goods, as well as taxable services. Texas cities, counties, transit authorities and special purpose districts have the option of imposing an additional local sales tax for a combined total of state and local taxes of 8 1/4% (.0825).

HOW OTHER VALLEY CITIES, COUNTIES PERFORMED IN MARCH 2015

All cities in Hidalgo County reported a total of $14,545,004.21 in local sales taxes in March 2015, compared with $13,889,398.93 in March 2014, an increase of 4.72 percent. Year-to-date (January through March), all cities in Hidalgo County have registered $66,386,492.58 in local sales taxes, compared with $63,831,251.06 for the same quarter in 2014, an improvement of four percent.

Hidalgo County government does not collect a local sales tax.

All cities in Cameron County generated $6,790,380.07 in local sales taxes in March 2015, compared with $6,407,400.04 in March 2014, an increase of 5.97 percent. Year-to-date (January through March), all cities in Cameron County have registered $29,814,287.85 in local sales taxes, compared with $28,808,110.40 for the same quarter in 2014, an improvement of 3.49 percent.

Cameron County government does not collect a local sales tax.

All cities in Starr County produced $523,948.15 in local sales taxes in March 2015, compared with $524,575.30 during the same month in 2014, a decrease of 0.11 percent. Year-to-date (January through March), all cities in Starr County have registered $2,346,562.56 in local sales taxes, compared with $2,268,081.49 for the same quarter in 2014, an improvement of 3.46 percent.

All cities in Willacy County produced $147,447.80 in local sales taxes in March 2015, compared with $149,704.09 during March 2014, a decrease of 1.50 percent. Willacy County government does not collect a local sales tax. Year-to-date (January through March), all cities in Willacy County have registered $647,890.93 in local sales taxes, compared with $694,304.99 for the same quarter in 2014, a decrease of 6.68 percent.

Willacy County government does not collect a local sales tax.

Based on the amount of sales taxes generated, according to the state comptroller’s office, the Valley’s major cities ranked accordingly in the following local sales tax figures for March 2015:

McAllen: $6,056,190.24, up 4.91 percent from March 2014 ($5,772,494.86);
Brownsville: $3,406,856.19, up 5.33 percent over March 2014 ($3,234,210.77);
Harlingen: $2,141,338.13, up 4.89 percent from March 2014 ($2,041,476.03);
Edinburg: $1,926,165.61, up 9.84 percent over March 2014 ($1,753,587.06);
Pharr: $1,457,420.80, up 9.39 percent over March 2014 ($1,332,227.05);
Mission: $1,434,944.47, down 9.11 percent from March 2014 ($1,578,820.90); and
Weslaco: $1,192,157.86, up 4.26 percent over March 2014 ($1,143,370.36).

At the statewide level, Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar said that state sales tax revenue in March was $2.3 billion, up 1.1 percent compared to May 2014.

“As we predicted in January, state revenues have grown at a moderate pace. March is the second consecutive month of relatively slow growth in sales tax revenue, and I remain cautiously optimistic about our economic progress,” Hegar said. “Growth in total sales tax revenues collected this month was muted by the significant slowdown in the oil and gas mining sector; however, collections from other major economic sectors – including retail and wholesale trade, restaurants, construction, and manufacturing – continued to grow. This marks the 61st consecutive month of growth in sales tax collections.”

For details of the March 2015 local sales tax figures for all cities, counties, transit systems, and special purpose taxing districts, locate the Monthly Sales Tax Allocation Comparison Summary Reports at the comptroller’s website: http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/allocsum/compsum.html

WELLS FARGO BRANCH REFLECTS GROWING EDINBURG ECONOMY

The Friday, May 8 grand opening of the Wells Fargo Bank branch along University Drive is latest symbol of Edinburg’s growing economy.

As part of its celebration, Wells Fargo Bank provided a $5,000 contribution to the Boys and Girls Club of Edinburg Rio Grande Valley, a move that came less than a year after Wells Fargo announced that it was honored as a top philanthropic company by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Edinburg RGV in the South Texas Area.

On June 9, 2014, Wells Fargo was recognized along with six other companies at the 2014 All Staff Conference dinner held at South Padre Island with the Boys & Girls Club’s Corporate Philanthropy Award.

Wells Fargo Bank has donated monetarily to the club’s program budget and Judi Flowers, Sales Coach Consultant, has served on the Club’s Board of Directors for over eight (8) years with two tenures as the Chief Volunteer officer.

“It is an honor to be recognized for the consistent, collective efforts of our team members and our company,” said Alma Ortega Johnson, South Texas area president. “Giving back to the community where we do business is something we’ve always believed in and it is a core principle in our corporate culture. Wells Fargo has consistently given of our time, expertise and funds so we can positively invest in the community around us.”
About Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.5 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco.

Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 9,000 locations, 12,500 ATMs, and the internet (wellsfargo.com), and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With more than 265,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 29 on Fortune’s 2014 rankings of America’s largest corporations. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy all our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Wells Fargo perspectives and stories are also available at blogs.wellsfargo.com and at wellsfargo.com/stories.

Since 1969, the Boys & Girls Club has played an integral role in the Edinburg community, providing daily programs and services to over 18,000 young people. During the School year the Club is open Monday – Friday, 3:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. and during the summer the hours are 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

On all Edinburg school district holidays and teachers work days the Legacy Center is open 7:30 am – 5:30 p.m.

The Club has moved its main site and administration to its new building the Legacy Center located at 702 Cullen Street (Rogers and 281). The Club offers programs that emphasize character and leadership development, education and career development, health and life skills, the arts, and sport, fitness and recreation.

If you would like to learn more about our scheduled activities call 956.383.2582 or visit our website http://www.edinburgkids.com.

If you would like to make a contribution please contact Sabrina Walker-Hernandez, Chief Professional Officer at 956.383.2582 or email swalker@edinburgkids.com or you can text “CLUB” to 20222 to donate $5.00. A one-time donation of $5.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance.

Donor must be age 18+ and all donations must be authorized by the account holder (e.g. parents). By texting YES, the user agrees to the terms and conditions. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider.

Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of the “BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF EDINBURG RGV” by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at http://www.hmgf.org/t. Message & Data Rates May Apply.

You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code “20222”; text HELP to “20222” for help or visit http://www.hmgf.org/t. Message and data rates may apply.

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The Edinburg Economic Development Corporation is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg City Council. It’s five-member governing board, which is appointed by the Edinburg City Council, includes Mayor Richard García as President, Fred Palacios as Secretary-Treasurer, and Felipe García, Dr. Havidán Rodríguez, and Steven Edward Cruz, II. For more information on the EEDC and the City of Edinburg, please log on to http://www.EdbgCityLimits.com or to http://www.facebook.com/edinburgedc

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