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Photograph By DIEGO REYNA

Featured, from left: Letty Reyes, Director of Business Development and Public Affairs, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation; Jonathan Torres, Production Specialist and Event Coordinator, City of Edinburg; and Leticia S. Leija, Director of Library and Cultural Arts, City of Edinburg, who are among the Board of Directors of the South Texas International Film Festival, which will be held on Friday, August 21, and Saturday, August 22, at several prime locations in Edinburg. The other members of the Board of Directors of the South Texas International Film Festival are: Magdiel Alfonso, Arts Coordinator, City of Edinburg; Agustín “Gus” García, Jr., Executive Director, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation; Letty González, President, Edinburg Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Dahlia Guerra, Dean, Department of Arts and Humanities, The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley in Edinburg; José Alberto Navarro, Consul for Political & Cultural Affairs, Consulate of Mexico in McAllen; Imelda Rodríguez, Director of Tourism for the Edinburg Convention and Visitors Bureau; Valente Rodríguez, Actor, Producer, Director, former star of The George López Show; Larry Safir, Member, Board of Directors, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, and former Executive Vice President, Entravision Communications Corporation; and Luis Enrique Suner, Filmmaker and Journalist, El Mañana;
Photograph By DIEGO REYNA

Known as the “Movie Capital of the Valley” in the late 1960s, Edinburg’s cultural life has been seen as a symbol of the city’s vitality and ingenuity. From the movie theaters in the 1930s and 1940s to the TV revolution in the 1950s, then advancing with cable TV, personal computers, the Internet, the cellphone and electronic tablet innovations, Edinburg’s creativity transforms and re-forms with the changing times. The informal title as “The Movie Capital of the Valley” was built on a rich history of film venues in Edinburg going back decades, and the visual arts continue even stronger today, with the impressive, 84,000-square-foot Carmike 20 Cinema, the groundbreaking Cinemark Movie Bistro, and the upcoming inaugural South Texas International Film Festival (www.stxff.us), which is set for Friday, August 21, and Saturday, August 22, at several prime location in the city. The South Texas International Film Festival will bring into clear view the potential value, in terms of economic development, of increasing local productions of movies and home videos in Edinburg and the Rio Grande Valley. The South Texas International Film Festival– of which the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation is a sponsor – will showcase the abundant regional talent of filmmakers, producers, actors, and related professional staffs, and promote the city and the region as a premium site for national and international movies to be filmed. The Edinburg Economic Development Corporation, of which Mayor Richard Garcia is President of its five-member Board of Directors, is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg Mayor and Edinburg City Council. In addition to the EEDC, the other major sponsors and organizers of this landmark two-day event include The City of Edinburg, the Edinburg Chamber of Commerce, Edinburg Arts, and the Consulado de México en McAllen (Mexican Consulate in McAllen). Why consider feature films, documentaries, and other visual works of art as economic development tools? Agustín “Gus” García, the Executive Director for the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation, explains the potential links between Hollywood, the home of the U.S. motion picture industry, and American hometowns, such as Edinburg. The many positive benefits of clustering creative businesses was explained by Jamie Bennett, Director of Public Affairs for the National Endowment for the Arts, said Gus García (no relation to the mayor), who cited the following perspectives: “A theater has 1,000 people show up at eight o’clock and leave at eleven o’clock. A museum might have 1,000 visitors spread out over the course of an eight-hour day. A rehearsal studio might have 30 people coming and going every hour over 12 hours,” said Bennett. “You put the three different organizations in proximity to one another and, all of a sudden, you have a full day of positive foot traffic on a street — feet that belong to people who need to eat meals, buy newspapers, go shopping and take public transportation. You have every mayor’s dream.” Investing in human capital “is immeasurable,” Gus García continued, and that is why the Edinburg EDC is a champion for developing human capital and in supporting projects that help a community prepare its future leaders. Mayor García contends that the role of arts and culture in shaping community-wide prosperity is a priority for the city. This includes the direct and indirect employment effects of the arts and culture. “Today’s workforce seeks certain characteristics in the places they choose to live. Places with entertainment options, public interaction, lively streets, and recreational and educational amenities are preferred, along with arts and culture activities and amenities,” the mayor said. “Leaders in the field of planning and economic development are developing noteworthy, creative approaches to making places of any scale more satisfying to this workforce, while increasing economic viability and competitiveness. This new collaboration between business owners is resulting in increased economic vitality and sense of community between merchants as well as residents, and Edinburg EDC, the Edinburg City Council, and our many partners in the public and private sectors want to capture them all.”

••••••

South Texas International Film Festival (www.stxff.us) bringing to clear view the potential value – through local productions of movies and videos for television – on economic development for Edinburg and South Texas

By LETTY REYES

Known as the “Movie Capital of the Valley” in the late 1960s, Edinburg’s cultural life has been seen as a symbol of the city’s vitality and ingenuity.

From the movie theaters in the 1930s and 1940s to the TV revolution in the 1950s, then advancing with cable TV, personal computers, the Internet, the cellphone and electronic tablet innovations, Edinburg’s creativity transforms and re-forms with the changing times.

The informal title as “The Movie Capital of the Valley” was built on a rich history of film venues in Edinburg going back decades, and the visual arts continue even stronger today, with the impressive, 84,000-square-foot Carmike 20 Cinema, the groundbreaking Cinemark Movie Bistro, and the upcoming inaugural South Texas International Film Festival (www.stxff.us), which is set for Friday, August 21, and Saturday, August 22, at several prime location in the city.

The South Texas International Film Festival will bring into clear view the potential value, in terms of economic development, of increasing local productions of movies and videos for television in Edinburg and the Rio Grande Valley.

The South Texas International Film Festival – of which the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation is a sponsor – will showcase the abundant regional talent of filmmakers, producers, actors, and related professional staffs and showcase the city and the Rio Grande Valley as a premium location for national and international movies to be filmed.

The Edinburg Economic Development Corporation, of which Mayor Richard García is the President of its five-member Board of Directors, is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg Mayor and Edinburg City Council.

In addition to the EEDC, the other major sponsors and organizers of this landmark two-day event include the The City of Edinburg, the Edinburg Chamber of Commerce, Edinburg Arts, and the Consulado de México en McAllen (Mexican Consulate in McAllen).

The Board of Directors of the South Texas International Film Festival are:

  •  Magdiel Alfonso, Arts Coordinator, City of Edinburg;
  •  Agustín “Gus” García, Jr., Executive Director, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation;
  •  Letty González, President, Edinburg Chamber of Commerce;
  •  Dr. Dahlia Guerra, Dean, Department of Arts and Humanities, The University of Texas-Rio Grande, Valley in Edinburg;
  •  Leticia S. Leija, Director of Library and Cultural Arts, City of Edinburg;
  •  José Alberto Navarro, Consul for Political & Cultural Affairs, Consulate of Mexico in McAllen;
  •  Letty Reyes, Director of Business Development and Public Affairs, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation;
  •  Imelda Rodríguez, Director of Tourism for the Edinburg Convention and Visitors Bureau;
  •  Valente Rodríguez, Actor, Producer, Director, former star of The George López Show;
  •  Larry Safir, Member, Board of Directors, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, and former Executive Vice President, Entravision Communications Corporation;
  •  Luis Enrique Suner, Filmmaker and Journalist, El Mañana; and
  •  Jonathan Torres, Production Specialist and Event Coordinator, City of Edinburg.

Why consider feature films, documentaries, and other visual works of art as economic development tools?

Agustín “Gus” García, the Executive Director for the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation, explains the potential links between Hollywood, the home of the U.S. motion picture industry, and American hometowns, such as Edinburg.

The many positive benefits of clustering creative businesses was explained by Jamie Bennett, Director of Public Affairs for the National Endowment for the Arts, said Gus García (no relation to the mayor), who cited the following perspectives:

“A theater has 1,000 people show up at eight o’clock and leave at eleven o’clock. A museum might have 1,000 visitors spread out over the course of an eight-hour day. A rehearsal studio might have 30 people coming and going every hour over 12 hours,” said Bennett. “You put the three different organizations in proximity to one another and, all of a sudden, you have a full day of positive foot traffic on a street — feet that belong to people who need to eat meals, buy newspapers, go shopping and take public transportation. You have every mayor’s dream.”

Investing in human capital “is immeasurable,” Gus García continued, and that is why the Edinburg EDC is a champion for developing human capital and in supporting projects that help a community prepare its future leaders.

“Their success ensures our future economic vitality. Building a community rich in culture yields civic pride and a prosperous economy,” the EEDC Executive Director noted. “Many times we ask ourselves: ‘How can we attract and retain profitable businesses and talented people?’ A key component of such efforts — and one that’s often mislabeled an ‘amenity’ (luxury) — is arts and culture.”

In general, the arts are defined as an outlet of expression, that is usually influenced by culture, and which in turn helps to change culture. Culture represents the total range of activities and ideas of a group of people with shared traditions, which are transmitted and reinforced by members of the group (Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition. HarperCollins Publishers. 01 Aug. 2015).

Mayor García contends that the role of arts and culture in shaping community-wide prosperity is a priority for the city. This includes the direct and indirect employment effects of the arts and culture.

“Today’s workforce seeks certain characteristics in the places they choose to live. Places with entertainment options, public interaction, lively streets, and recreational and educational amenities are preferred, along with arts and culture activities and amenities,” the mayor said. “Leaders in the field of planning and economic development are developing noteworthy, creative approaches to making places of any scale more satisfying to this workforce, while increasing economic viability and competitiveness. This new collaboration between business owners is resulting in increased economic vitality and sense of community between merchants as well as residents, and Edinburg EDC, the Edinburg City Council, and our many partners in the public and private sectors want to capture them all.”

Edinburg’s elected and appointed policy makers also believe that the presence of artists and cultural organizations retain and attract businesses leaders who are looking for creative workers, inspire students who want to experience the unique opportunities Edinburg offers, and increase tourism to the area.

“The economic development field has changed in the last decade from one that primarily emphasized location and firm-based approaches to one that more overtly acknowledges the development of human capital,” added EEDC Executive Director Gus García. “Human capital refers to the sets of skills, knowledge, and value contributed by a population and has become a recognized asset as firms choose where to locate – and cities choose what to advertise and develop and whom to recruit – and entrepreneurs develop economic activity.”

CARMIKE 20 CINEMAS, CINEMARK MOVIE BISTRO

Many forces are changing the way people experience the arts, Gus García said.

“Technology and new media give individuals the ability to experience the arts whenever and wherever they want. Artists and audiences make use of advanced technology and social media to create, experience, and augment artistic works,” he observed.

Carmike 20 Cinema and Cinemark Movie Bistro are two examples in Edinburg of new technology, convenience, and economic development coming together.

Carmike 2o Cinema, located at 3003 South Expressway 281, is one 270 theaters and 2,881 screens in 41 states, with all of their theaters equipped to provide digital cinema, with 275 theaters and 1,079 equipped with 3-D capability. Carmike’s focus for its theater locations is mid-sized communities such as Edinburg.

When first built in 1999, Carmine 20 Cinema represented an investment of $10 million, 84,000-square-foot venue with stadium seating, and draws thousands of visitors per month to Edinburg, who then have the opportunity to also shop and dine in the community.

If Carmike 20 Cinema was to be built in 2015, it would cost more than $14 million, according to the Consumer Price Index calculator provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor (http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl?cost1=10%2C000%2C000&year1=1999&year2=2015).

August 2015 marks the one-year anniversary of Cinemark Movie Bistro, located at 2001 West Trenton Road. The ultramodern six-screen theatre, which officially opened for business on Friday, August 30, 2014, offers customers an enhanced dining menu and a variety of beverage options including favorite beers, premium wines and frozen cocktails that can be enjoyed in the auditoriums.

Each theater at Cinemark Movie Bistro features a state-of-the-art entertainment environment offering digital projection, RealD 3D capability, and enhanced sound systems.

HISTORY OF PREVIOUS MOVIE THEATERS IN EDINBURG

Next to Edinburg’s downtown, on East University Drive, is the Citrus Theater – not currently in service, but for which for decades was one of South Texas’ premiere movie theaters – which opened its doors in 1941.

But the Citrus Theater still has up-to-date plumbing and wiring inside and cast iron seating that Felipe García, an Edinburg attorney who purchased the building in 1996, refuses to part with.

“The place is like a time capsule,” said Felipe García, who was recently concluded distinguished service as a member of the Board of Directors for the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation. “You go inside and it’s like it always was.”

Any plan to revitalize downtown Edinburg will undoubtedly include the Citrus Theater, a massive structure that used to seat up to 800, and takes up much of the block. It has only been used for storage of court files since Felipe García bought it.

“I have nothing on the drawing board (but) I’m listening,” he said. “We’re open to anything short of knocking it down.”

In 1970, in addition to the Citrus Theater, other hot spots for film presentations in Edinburg were the Century, and Capri movie theaters – also neighboring the city’s downtown – and whose presence allowed the community to market itself as “The Movie Capital of the Valley.”

SPANISH-LANGUAGE FILMS PART OF CITY’S LEGACY

The Aztec, also known as the Juárez Theatre, was the new house that was built by L.J. Montague, owner of the Valley Theatre in Edinburg, as reported in the March 18, 1930, issue of Motion Picture Times. The new theatre was intended to serve the Spanish-speaking population of the area, and was to have 350 seats.

The Aztec is mentioned frequently in various issues of Box Office in the 1940s, but without details. Then, the house underwent a remodeling in 1966 and was reopened as an art house called the Century. The August 8, 1966, issue of Box Office reported on the name change.

The Aztec may have also briefly been called the Alameda Theatre. A review of the Mexican movie El Gallo de Oro by manager Mike Benítez of the Alameda Theatre, Edinburg, was published in the “Exhibitor Has His Say” section of Box Office on November 22, 1965. That’s the only mention of the Alameda in Box Office, but if it wasn’t the Aztec under another name, then, there was a fourth theater in Edinburg around that time. The Citrus and Juárez are accounted for at that time.

Like in many parts of the United States, the development of business in the Rio Grande Valley was greatly influenced by the arrival of Mexican migrant workers before, during and after World War II. The presence of thousands of immigrants stimulated the activity of local establishments, including movie houses. Although Hollywood films dominated the screens in the Valley, Mexicans just as easily could select from an assortment of Spanish-language movies.

Prior to 1930, very few entertainment spots in the Rio Grande Valley catered specifically to Hispanics.

A new entertainment center opened in Edinburg at this time: the 350-seat Grande Theater, located on Harriman Street. Its owner, Velma Montague, planned this theater with the explicit intention of showing films to the the Spanish-speaking audience. The local newspaper El Defensor (March 28, 1930) declared that the Teatro Grande had been built. Mrs. Montague, who was the wife of a prominent doctor, also owned the Aztec Theater (214 E. Cano Street) and the Valley Theater (222 E. Harriman).

In 1956, a new entertainment center began service in Edinburg: El Patio Drive-In Theater, which was owned by Fred Crowson at what is now the Walmart store on Sugar Road and University Drive.

UT-RGV IN EDINBURG A CULTURAL CENTER OF SOUTH TEXAS

Not only were Edinburg’s movie theaters popular back then, but adding to the entertainment line-up and growth of the area was the addition of the Fine Arts Auditorium at the then-named University of Texas-Pan American. That complex served as the permanent home for drama, music, speech, and art at the Edinburg campus.

Since its founding days in 1927, the currently named UT-Pan American – which will be officially renamed The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley beginning with the Fall 2015 semester – has been the cultural center of South Texas.

From opera companies to symphonies to individual performance by some of the best known artists in the world, the local university and its auditoriums have been the main performance stages in the region. With the construction of the UTPA Fine Arts Complex and the Fine Arts Auditorium more than 40 years ago, the university became an even more important resource for students, performers, and the community.

Completed in February 1970, under the leadership of President Ralph Schilling, the Fine Arts Complex and the Fine Arts Auditorium quickly became a significant part of the campus landscape, which at the time was booming with rapid growth after its admission to the state system, and subsequent transition from college to university status.

In 1970, the Fine Arts Center, which included the Auditorium and Fine Arts Buildings B & C, was one of the largest buildings on campus. Throughout the years, the Fine Arts Auditorium has served as the cultural center and the heart of the community, as well as a symbol of the importance of the arts in the Rio Grande Valley.

For 42 years, UT-Pan American’s Fine Arts Auditorium has hosted numerous performances by UTPA faculty, student music competitions, theatre productions, and the Valley Symphony Orchestra. It also hosted famous musicians such as the legendary pianist Jorge Bolet, the U.S. Army Band, the Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán, numerous community dance companies, and high school choir/bands/orchestras.

It has also received many visits by notable public figures such as former U.S. President Bill Clinton and former U.S. President George H.W. Bush, Dr. Maya Angelou, a renowned American author, poet, dancer, actress, and singer, Michael Dell, the chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer of Dell,
Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Premier of the Soviet Union, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the son of former U.S. Sen. Robert Kennedy, D-New York, and who is a resolute defender of the environment, and many other dignitaries.

ALBERT L. JEFFERS THEATRE AT UT-RGV

The Albert L. Jeffers Theatre at The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley in Edinburg complements the newly-opened Academic and Performing Arts Center on campus.

The UT-RGV University Theatre typically produces four live shows under its Main Stage program during the fall and spring semesters. Other family-friendly productions are also shown throughout the year for local audiences.

The goal is to expose audiences, actors and all participants to each theatrical period, style and genre. The local theatre group features acts from Greek tragedies to modern comedies in an effort to educate and entertain.

The Albert L. Jeffers Theatre is named in honor of Albert L. Jeffers in recognition of his support and wonderful generosity to UT-RGV and its immediate predecessor, UT-Pan American.

Driven by a passionate belief in the power of education, Jeffers, an attorney specializing in intellectual property law, created several charitable remainder unitrusts naming universities as beneficiaries. At the time of his gift to The University of Texas-Pan American Foundation in the form of a charitable remainder unitrust, his donation was the largest single gift from an individual ever received by the foundation. The funds from the generous gift are used for full scholarships to The University of Texas-Pan American/UT-RGV and will help many future generations of college students follow their dreams.

EDINBURG MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM

The Gothic revival-style Edinburg Municipal Auditorium, located next to Edinburg City Hall, was built in 1926 to serve the new Edinburg Junior College, the Edinburg high school, and the community. It was designated a Texas Historic Landmark in 1989.

High school and college choirs and bands performed on its stage, and drama students presented plays there in the fall and spring. In 1938, a group of residents formed Cultural Arts Inc., which brought in First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, writer Carl Sandburg, and soprano opera singer Lily Pons, among others.

It received intermittent use from that time on, most recently as a place to have orientation for jurors serving at the courthouse.

Edinburg Junior College — which would later become Pan American College, Pan American University, the University of Texas-Pan American, and now The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley – discontinued use of the auditorium in 1971. But the high school continued to use it until it was deeded to the city in 1984.

“The Edinburg Municipal Auditorium had been dormant prior to the construction of the Edinburg City Hall, which incorporated the auditorium into its plans,” said Edinburg City Manager, Ramiro Garza, Jr. “The city intended to use the auditorium as a centerpiece for a proposed corridor now being developed between Edinburg City Hall and the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley.”

Now serving as an anchor for the cultural events, “the city wants to bring to the area as part of the downtown master plan its developed,” added Mayor García, who delivered the State-of-the-City Address earlier in late May at the historic facility.

With seating for up to 750 people, the venue can house large audiences for such special events.

“The Edinburg Municipal Auditorium will become a cultural center for the city again,” the mayor predicted. “It’s a beautiful building. It’s well-built and will serve the community for a long time to come.”

VELA, TREVIÑO, McNALLEN, AND GARZA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The newest project at Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District was marked officially by the groundbreaking of Robert Vela High School Performing Arts Center.

Located at 801 E. Canton Road, the 19,709-square-foot facility boasts a 361-seat theatre, classroom space, dressing rooms and design shop. The $7.5 million performing arts center is the fourth one for the Edinburg School District.

The theatre features modern technology including theatrical lighting, an intuitive intercommunication system, powerful rigging and effects speakers located around the theatre to provide ambient noise for dramatic performances. Combined, the innovative systems are similar to those used in a professional theatre, and will transform the students’ performances into a fully-immersive 21st century learning experience.

The Robert Vela High School Performing Arts Center is preceded by the Ciro L. Treviño Performing Arts Center at Edinburg High School, the Pat McNallen Performing Arts Center at Edinburg North High School, and the Alberto Garza, Jr. Performing Arts Center at Johnny Economedes High School.

The Treviño, McNallen, and Garza performing arts centers were simultaneously constructed between October 2009 and November 2010 through Infrastructure Facility Allotment funding from the State of Texas. The district was eligible for funding because each performing arts center was also multiple learning environments for students and teachers.

These centers have helped create an environment of cultural diversity, educational enrichment, and fulfilling experiences benefiting patrons who have a great appreciation of the arts.

EDINBURG ARTS FOUNDATION

Rich in art and culture, Edinburg continues to preserve, promote, develop and encourage the community’s cultural expression by enhancing the quality of life for its residents and neighboring visitors.

Edinburg’s Cultural Arts Board was created to promote a nurturing environment to advance the knowledge, discovery and engagement in visual/performing arts, creative writing, music, dance and other forms of self-expression.

The Edinburg Arts Foundation was established to bring a Cultural Arts Center to downtown Edinburg. Eventually, Edinburg’s downtown could become a thriving center of commerce and culture similar to what cities such as Fort Worth have done to revitalize their downtown areas.

“Now, (Fort Worth’s downtown) is the heart of the city again with family events and a concentration of nightlife,” Mayor García said. “If they can do it, why not us?”

JARDÍN DEL ARTE (GARDEN OF ART)

Edinburg residents are enjoying the Fifth Annual Season of Jardín Del Arte.

This event, held every second Friday of the month from April through November, features live music, performance art, great food and original art by local and international artists. Jardín del Arte events are scheduled from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Edinburg City Hall Courtyard, located at 415 W. University Drive.

Edinburg’s Jardín del Arte was created to celebrate the richness of Edinburg’s diverse art, culture, and people. Through Jardín del Arte, Edinburg Arts, a non-profit organization, provides local artists a place to showcase their talent while inspiring the community to enjoy, create and celebrate the arts.

$42.7 MILLION, 1,000-SEAT ACADEMIC AND PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AT UT-RGV

On April 23, 2015, the $42.7 million Academic and Performing Arts Center at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley in Edinburg replaced the former UTPA’s Fine Arts Complex and Fine Arts Auditorium, thus providing students, faculty, performers, and the community a state-of-the-art venue for a wide range of arts and cultural events.

It will become the platform for the arts in South Texas and continue the university’s initiative started in 1927 to be the cultural center in the region and stand as a symbol of the importance of the arts in the Rio Grande Valley.

“The Academic and Performing Arts Center is a beautiful venue for wonderful events, fabulous performances, guest speakers and presentation,” said Dr. Dahlia Guerra, Dean of the UT-RGV College of Arts and Humanities.

The grand auditorium offers patrons a modern experience, with the latest in lighting and sound equipment, the best acoustics possible and built-in art galleries. The Academic and Performing Arts Center also provides much needed academic space, with four large rehearsal halls that will be in constant use by some 400 music majors and future students at UT-RGV.

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Letty Reyes is Director of Business Development and Public Affairs, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation. David A. Díaz contributed to this article. The Edinburg Economic Development Corporation is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg Mayor and the Edinburg City Council. It’s five-member governing board, which is appointed by the Edinburg City Council, includes Mayor Richard García as President, Mark Iglesias as Vice President, Harvey Rodríguez as Treasurer, Rolando “Ronnie” Guerra, Sr. as Secretary, and Richard W. Ruppert, Member. For more information on the EEDC and the City of Edinburg, please log on to http://Edinburgedc.com or to http://www.facebook.com/edinburgedc

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