Select Page

garcia

Featured, from left: Congressman Joaquín Castro, D-San Antonio; and Mayor Richard García, President, Board of Directors, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation.

Photograph by ISMAEL GARCÍA

Edinburg’s retail economy for the month of November 2014 was 6.69 percent better than the same month in 2013, a figure that was best among all major Valley cities, and higher than the growth rates for all cities combined, respectively, in each of the four Valley counties, Mayor Richard García, President, Board of Directors, Edinburg Economic Development Corporation, has announced. The EEDC is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg City Council. Based on the amount of local sales taxes collected, which reflects the strength of an economy, Edinburg’s retail sector generated more than $1.5 million in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with more than $1.4 million in November 2013 – producing the improvement of almost seven percent. Among the Valley’s largest economies, Edinburg’s improvement rate of 6.69 percent was followed by Pharr (5.56 percent), McAllen (5.07 percent), Mission (4.76 percent), Brownsville (4.30 percent); Weslaco (2.79 percent), and Harlingen (-1.57 percent). In addition, from January through November 2014, Edinburg’s retail economy maintained a double-digit upswing over the same 11-month period in 2013, generating $16,848,135 in local sales taxes, compared with $15,292,818 for January through November 2013 – a rise of 10.17 percent. This latest data was released on Wednesday, January 7, by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. The local sales tax figures represent sales reported by monthly filers in November sent to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts in December, and returned as sales tax rebates to the respective local government entities in January. The local sales tax is used in Edinburg to help pay for many city services, while the EEDC uses its one-half cent local sales tax to help generate economic development in the city. Augustín “Gus” García, the EEDC’s Executive Director for the Edinburg Economic Development, said the performance of the city’s retail economy for 2014 has come from a combination of proven leadership by the Edinburg City Council and EEDC Board of Directors, the strategies they have developed and put into place through the city and EEDC staffs, and by the vision of business owners and their employees in the city to provide high-quality goods and services that draw consumers from Edinburg and beyond “EEDC’s projects constantly bring together leaders who craft state policy, influence economic advancement and have the capabilities to effect change at a regional and global level. EEDC works with them to promote leadership, information exchange, training and experience,” García said. “The future of Edinburg lies before us, fraught with issues, yet poised with promise. On the threshold of a new turning point, 2015, we are presented with limitless opportunities.”

••••••

Edinburg’s retail economy in November 2014 up 6.69 percent over November 2013 – best improvement rate among Valley’s largest cities

By DAVID A. DÍAZ
Legislativemedia@aol.com

Edinburg’s retail economy for the month of November 2014 was 6.69 percent better than the same month in 2013, a figure that was best among all major Valley cities, and higher than the growth rates for all cities combined, respectively, in each of the four Valley counties.

Based on the amount of local sales taxes collected, which reflects the strength of an economy, Edinburg’s retail sector generated more than $1.5 million in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with more than $1.4 million in November 2013 – producing the improvement of almost seven percent.

Among the Valley’s largest economies, Edinburg’s improvement rate of 6.69 percent was followed by Pharr (5.56 percent), McAllen (5.07 percent), Mission (4.76 percent), Brownsville (4.30 percent); Weslaco (2.79 percent), and Harlingen (-1.57 percent).

In addition, from January through November 2014, Edinburg’s retail economy maintained a double-digit upswing over the same 11-month period in 2013, generating $16,848,135 in local sales taxes, compared with $15,292,818 for January through November 2013 – a rise of 10.17 percent.

This latest data was released on Wednesday, January 7, by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, according to the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation.

The EEDC is the jobs-creation arm of the Edinburg City Council.

The local sales tax figures represent sales reported by monthly filers in November sent to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts in December, and returned as sales tax rebates to the respective local government entities in January.

The local sales tax is used in Edinburg to help pay for many city services, while the EEDC uses its one-half cent local sales tax to help generate economic development in the city.

The sales tax, formally known as the State Sales and Use Tax, is imposed on all retail sales, leases and rentals of most goods, as well as taxable services. Texas cities, counties, transit authorities and special purpose districts have the option of imposing an additional local sales tax for a combined total of state and local taxes of 8 1/4% (.0825).

“WE ARE PRESENTED WITH LIMITLESS OPPORTUNITIES”

Augustín “Gus” García, the EEDC’s Executive Director for the Edinburg Economic Development, said the performance of the city’s retail economy for 2014 has come from a combination of proven leadership by the Edinburg City Council and EEDC Board of Directors, the strategies they have developed and put into place through the city and EEDC staffs, and by the vision of business owners and their employees in the city to provide high-quality goods and services that draw consumers from Edinburg and beyond

“EEDC’s projects constantly bring together leaders who craft state policy, influence economic advancement and have the capabilities to effect change at a regional and global level. EEDC works with them to promote leadership, information exchange, training and experience,” García said. “The future of Edinburg lies before us, fraught with issues, yet poised with promise. On the threshold of a new turning point, 2015, we are presented with limitless opportunities.”

One of those projects is a $9.2 million Edinburg Youth Sports Facility, which the city and the EEDC are sharing the construction costs.

At almost 90,000-square-feet in size, the athletic complex, located down the street from the intersection of Closner Boulevard and Freddy González Drive, is the latest addition to an impressive slate of major facilities beginning to transform the landscape in Edinburg.

It will feature a wide range of fitness programs for the city’s youths and families while also providing an atmosphere of big-time sports by doubling as the main practice home for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers NBA Development League team. The Vipers, which are part of the Houston Rockets organization, has produced world-class athletes.

The Edinburg Youth Sports Facility, which is scheduled to open in March, will also have a direct connection to what promises to be one of the most impressive sports facilities south of San Antonio – the $55 million, 8,500-seat arena that will be home for the Vipers, as well as host other major gatherings, from concerts to conventions.

The state-of-the-art arena, which will be built right off the North Interstate Highway 69 access road in southwest Edinburg, is in the last phases of planning.

Both new construction projects are part of economic growth and quality-of-life advances being championed by the city council and EEDC, García noted.

INVESTING IN YOUNG PEOPLE OF EDINBURG BENEFITS ECONOMY, FUTURE OF THE CITY

“Edinburg’s focus on empowering its vast human capital – which are the skills, knowledge and experience of our citizens – continues to gather momentum, which will help ensure a promising future for our youth and young adults,” he said. “At the EEDC, we support their dreams – which benefits all of us – by developing landmark endeavors and projects that are custom-created to support the opportunities Edinburg faces as we grow into a global community.”

Being home to the largest campus of The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg continues to position itself to attract more diversified businesses, not only as a result of the academic excellence of the university’s faculty and students, but also because of the UT-RGV School of Medicine, which will have a major presence in the city when it opens to students next fall.

“In just the past two years, new construction at UT-RGV in Edinburg has approached $136 million for new facilities, and that figure does not include a $42.7 million fine arts center that will open later this year,” said García. “Having a major university and a medical school in a city our size is amazing, and sends the message that Edinburg and the Rio Grande Valley are indeed a region where people want to set up or expand their businesses, work, live and enjoy life.”

The EEDC executive director said the city leadership’s willingness to work in partnership with neighboring communities has been a major element in Edinburg’s successes.

“We share a commitment to promoting a positive economic climate to support the growth and development of businesses and communities in the region. We have a broad perception of the strengths and needs of the community we represent. We believe in the people, businesses, and communities we foster and are excited to see what the future holds for the Edinburg Economic Development Corporation,” García said.

He praised his counterparts in the city government and his fellow staff members at the EEDC for their expertise, professionalism, and accomplishments in helping put into action the vision of the city council and EEDC board of directors.

“I am always thankful to the Edinburg City Council, and City Manager Ramiro Garza, Jr., and his staff, for their ongoing support, as well as I am deeply appreciative to the EEDC Board of Directors, both past and present, for the very important work they do,” García said. “But I am especially proud of the incredibly talented staff of which I have the privilege of working with here at the EEDC. They are true professionals who make me proud each and every day.”

Promising more great news in this new year, he said residents of Edinburg deserve to take a pause – and a bow – to enjoy the fruits of their labor that highlighted the past year.

“The end of each year gives us all a chance to reflect on all that has happened, and to examine our priorities for the coming year,” García said. “2014 was a reminder of the abundance of assets within Edinburg.”

EDINBURG’S RETAIL RATE OF IMPROVEMENT ALSO KEPT PACE WITH STATEWIDE AVERAGE

In the latest report by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Edinburg’s 6.69 percent increase kept pace with other cities in the state, which combined, showed an average of 7.1 percent improvement in November 2014 over November 2013.

Edinburg’s 6.69 percent increase was better than the average of all cities in their respective counties in the Valley.

All cities in Hidalgo County reported a total of $12,542,875.09 in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with $11,856,513.92 in November 2013, an increase of 5.78 percent. Hidalgo County government does not collect a local sales tax.

All cities in Cameron County generated $5,401,816.87 in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with $5,302,649.16 in November 2013, an improvement of 1.87 percent. Cameron County government does not collect a local sales tax.

All cities in Starr County produced $437,277.97 in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with $434,959.06 during the same month in 2013, an improvement of 0.53 percent. Starr County government does not collect a local sales tax.

All cities in Willacy County produced $112,782.18 in local sales taxes in November 2014, compared with $135,516.14 during November 2013, a decrease of 16.77 percent. Willacy County government does not collect a local sales tax.

According to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, the rates of improvement – and in one case, decrease – of local sales taxes generated by the major communities in the Valley follow:

• Edinburg’s retail economy in November 2014 generated $1,541,612.70 in local sales taxes, up 6.69 percent over November 2013;

• Pharr registered the second-best improvement among major Valley cities, up 5.56 percent in November 2014 over the same month in 2013, with $1,231,603.69 in local sales taxes being generated, compared with $1,166,651.37 in November 2013;

• McAllen – the traditional retail giant of the Valley – reported $5,360,226.64 in local sales taxes in November 2014, up 5.o7 percent over November 2013’s local sales taxes of $5,101,245.18;

• Mission reported a 4.76 increase in retail sales for November 2014 over the November 2013 figure. In November 2014, Mission generated $1,260,720.08 in local sales taxes, compared with $1,203,343.56 in November 2013;

• Brownsville’s local sales tax collections in November 2014 came in at $2,945,126.73, a 4.30 percent improvement over the November 2013 figure of $2,823,492.62;

• Weslaco generated $916,960.46 in local sales tax collections in November 2014, an improvement of 2.79 percent over November 2013, when its retail economy saw $892,054.55 in local sales tax production; and

• Harlingen was the only major Valley city that experienced a drop in its retail activity for November 2014 as compared with the same month in 2013. Based on local sales tax collections for November 2014, Harlingen reported $1,685,419.83 in local sales taxes generated, compared with $1,712,421.42 in November 2013, a decrease of 1.57 percent.

According to the state comptroller’s office, the Valley’s major cities reported the following local sales tax figures, listed in order of amount, for November 2014:

• McAllen: $5,360,226.64, up 5.07 percent from November 2013 ($5,101,245.18);
• Brownsville: $2,945,126.73, up 4.30 percent over November 2013; ($2,823,492.62);
• Harlingen: $1,685,419.93, down 1.57 percent from November 2013 ($1,712,421.42);
• Edinburg: $1,541,612.70, up 6.69 percent over November 2013 ($1,444,833.75);
• Pharr: $1,231,603.69, up 5.56 percent over November 2013 ($1,166,651.37);
• Mission: $1,260,720.08, up 4.76 percent from November 2013 ($1,203,343.56); and
• Weslaco: $916,960.46, up 2.79 percent over November 2013 ($892,054.55).

For details of the November 2014 local sales tax figures for all cities, counties, transit systems, and special purpose taxing districts, locate the Monthly Sales Tax Allocation Comparison Summary Reports at the comptroller’s website:

http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/allocsum/compsum.html

Share This

Share this post with your friends!